PRINCE2® process diagrams | Free PDFs

By on 19 Nov 2018

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The 2 diagrams below show the PRINCE2 process model. The first diagram shows a more detailed representation because it includes the activities of each process. The second diagram is less detailed but shows the time sequence of each process. You can download PDF versions which have been designed to be printed out at A3 size.

Both diagrams have been updated to reflect the latest version of PRINCE2 which was released in 2017.

PRINCE2 activity diagram

PRINCE2 process model - activity view

Note: you can add this diagram to your web site but you must link back to this page as the original source.
Click the image to see a high resolution version, or you can download the PDF version here.

Each of the 7 processes are shown by the large coloured rectangles. These are: Directing a Project, Starting Up a Project, Initiating a Project, Controlling a Stage, Managing a Stage Boundary, Managing Product Delivery and Closing a Project.

The diagram above shows the 7 PRINCE2 processes. These are the large coloured rectangles on the diagram. Inside each process rectangle are smaller rectangles representing each activity which occurs within the process. Each rectangle also lists the products (or outputs) or the process.

The diagram does not show the details of where every management product gets updated, because the diagram would become too complex by doing this. Instead, the diagram focuses on where the products are created, reviewed and approved and the most important updates.

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Activities

You can see that inside each process rectangle are several smaller rectangles. These smaller rectangles are the activities which form each process. Each of the activities has a name which is shown on the rectangle. An activity in PRINCE2 is simply a series of steps to be performed. The PRINCE2 manual describes who is responsible for each step, what should be produced and when it should occur.

Triggers

A trigger in PRINCE2 is an event or a decision which triggers one of the 7 processes. Triggers on the diagram are shown by a pale grey lozenge shape. Each trigger has a name and an arrow attached to it. The direction of the arrow shows which process is triggered.

Inside each process rectangle are a list of outputs with letters after them. The letters indicate what happens to each output as follows:

  • A – the output is approved in the process
  • C – the output is created in the process
  • R – the output is reviewed in the process
  • U - the output is updated in the process

Some of the outputs have an asterisk (*) after them. This indicates that the output is not one of the PRINCE2 management products.

Outputs

Attached to some of the triggers are coloured swirl shapes. These are meant to indicate the outputs which are used as inputs into the next process. The shapes contain numbers which indicate the outputs concerned and the colour of the shape indicates from which process it is an output.

For example, take a look at the arrow which comes out of the yellow process (starting up a project). There is a trigger attached to the arrow called "Request to initiate a project". You can see a yellow swirl shape attached to it. Yellow indicates that the outputs are listed in the yellow rectangle (i.e. the starting up a project). process). In this case, the two numbers are 8 and 9. Looking these up in the list of outputs from starting up a project tells us that the project brief and the initiation stage plan are used as inputs into the process which is triggered next – i.e. the directing a project process.

PRINCE2 time sequence diagram

PRINCE2 process model - activity view

Note: you can add this diagram to your web site but you must link back to this page as the original source.
Click the image to see a high resolution version, or you can download the PDF version here.

The diagram above shows the 7 PRINCE2 processes occurring in time sequence. On this diagram time is running from left to right.

Management stages

The vertical thin black lines represent the start and end of a PRINCE2 management stage. On the left, the 3 curly braces named “Directing”, “Managing” and “Delivering” represent the 3 levels of the PRINCE2 project management team namely, the project board, the project manager, and the team manager levels.

Management levels

The curly braces indicate which processes are performed by each level of the project management team. At the top of the diagram, you can see that part of the starting up a project process and all of the directing a project process is performed by the "Directing" level i.e. the project board.

At the bottom of the diagram you can see the braces labelled "Delivering" and to the right of the label you can see the process labelled managing product delivery. This is performed by the "Delivering" level of the project management team i.e. the team manager.

In the centre of the diagram on the left, you can see the "Managing" curly brace. This refers to the project manager. To the right of the braces you can see that part of the starting up a project process is performed by the project manager as well as all of the initiating a project, controlling a stage, managing a stage boundary and closing a project processes.

The lines and process in orange indicates what happens in an exception situation. The grey ellipse shapes represent PRINCE2 triggers (events of decisions which trigger a process). The arrow attached to the trigger shows which process is triggered.

Time-driven controls

The diagram also shows 2 time-driven controls – highlight reports and checkpoint reports. These are shown at regular intervals on the diagram and are also shown in the key at the bottom of the diagram.

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